Dating someone in your class

Rated 4.55/5 based on 695 customer reviews

People from different social classes may have trouble understanding the way other classes operate.

The "New York Times" article "When Richer Weds Poorer, Money Isn't the Only Difference" describes a couple in which the lower-class husband did not fit in with people from his wealthy wife's social class -- because he was a straight shooter and she and her friends talked around issues.

He treats me like a fully-human and individual person.

I actually turned down a 2nd date with a guy who had that feeling about him.

(Apparently, if you're a lady who wants to put a ring on it, Silicon Valley is a single-man mecca.) But Birger also suggests that this "man shortage" might result in a surprising trend: women dating outside their class and education levels.

"These lopsided numbers might not matter if young, college-educated women become more willing to date — and, eventually, marry — across socioeconomic lines," Birger explained in the At face value, the suggestion that women date outside their class seems hopelessly old-fashioned, not to mention politically incorrect.

People from different social classes have different ways of acting -- similar to a culture -- that can take time to understand.

If your boyfriend has enough family money to buy designer clothing, drive his own sports car and apply to dozens of colleges, while you are flipping burgers at the local hamburger joint to scrape together enough money to attend the local community college, you may have trouble seeing eye to eye.

If your girlfriend is wealthy, and you come from a family with less money, you might feel as though there is a power imbalance in the relationship.

Often the person with more money ends up making most of the decisions -- because she may be the one paying for things most of the time.

Although this is not a deal-breaker, it can take time to get comfortable with the idea that there is a natural imbalance of power in the relationship that will be hard to change.

While there are 5.5 million college-educated women ages 22 to 29 in the United States, there are only 4.1 million college-educated men.

The book raises some interesting questions about what we look for in a mate, as well as some alternative solutions for the marriage-minded among us.

Leave a Reply