Dating abuse article

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Nine percent of girls and eight percent of boys have been seen in an emergency room for injuries received from someone they dated.Some forms of abuse are not as obvious, such as using control as a form of abuse where the abuser assumes control over the other person's life and keeps the abused person in-line.Talk to teens now about the importance of developing healthy, respectful relationships.CDC’s Division of Violence Prevention is leading the initiative, Dating Matters®: Strategies to Promote Healthy Teen Relationships.It also arises when one partner tries to maintain power and control over the other through abuse or violence, for example when a relationship has broken down.This abuse or violence can take a number of forms, such as sexual assault, sexual harassment, threats, physical violence, verbal, mental, or emotional abuse, social sabotage, and stalking. It can include psychological abuse, emotional blackmail, sexual abuse, physical abuse and psychological manipulation.

In a recent national survey , 8 percent of high school students reported physical violence and 7 percent reported that they experienced sexual violence from a dating partner in the 12 months before the survey.

Additionally, Strauss notes that even relatively minor acts of physical aggression by women are a serious concern: 'Minor' assaults perpetrated by women are also a major problem, even when they do not result in injury, because they put women in danger of much more severe retaliation by men.

[...] It will be argued that in order to end 'wife beating,' it is essential for women also to end what many regard as a 'harmless' pattern of slapping, kicking, or throwing something at a male partner who persists in some outrageous behavior and 'won't listen to reason.' reports that a 13-year longitudinal study found that a woman's aggression towards a man was equally important as the man's tendency towards violence in predicting the likelihood of overall violence: "Since much IPV [Intimate Partner Violence] is mutual and women as well as men initiate IPV, prevention and treatment approaches should attempt to reduce women's violence as well as men's violence.

Media often shows abuse as part of a normal relationship, which causes confusion and persistent misunderstanding.

Understanding what makes a healthy relationship and knowing and understanding what the signs of abuse are will go far in ending the cycle of violence.

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